In Search of

Barnabas
Horton

From English Baker to Long Island Proprietor, 1600–1680

Overview

This book explores the life and times of Barnabas Horton, a baker from Leicestershire, England who crossed the Atlantic Ocean for New England and eventually put down roots in Southold, New York. Traditional myths collapse under historical evidence as the author traces Barnabas’s life through church records, legal documents, and social histories.

The author introduces readers to the Horton ancestors in Leicestershire who shaped Barnabas’s life, and paints a vivid picture of the grueling routine and frustrations of a common baker in late-medieval England. Readers get to know his wife Mary Langton, and the role her family played in his decision to emigrate. As a micro-history, In Search of Barnabas Horton also sheds light on the rough-and-tumble beginnings of a so-called Puritan settlement on the East End of Long Island. How Reverend John Youngs’s dream to establish a model Puritan theocracy became mired by frontier realities of death, social rivals, and independent-minded merchants. Yet the final blow—Southold’s submission to secular Connecticut Colony—came from within as second-generation sons and daughters refused the spiritual path forged by their fathers. Readers will better understand Southold’s long-standing culture of self-determination and self-reliance by following the town’s bumpy transition from an outcrop of English wigwams to defiant settlement in the face of callous government policies.

The author enlivens her narrative with colonial broadsides, prints, maps, family charts, and explanatory tables. Important Horton records and artifacts are not overlooked—images of Barnabas’s marriage license application, musket, carved wooden chest, and walking stick; Jonathan’s custom-made “Great Chair” and original passbook of land transactions provide tangible evidence of this early New England family. The biography ends with an in-depth discussion of Barnabas’s nine children and their familial, if sometimes feisty, relationships with each other, neighbors, and civil authority.

Five appendices support the biographical narrative, providing researchers an opportunity to analyze for themselves a preliminary family pedigree and primary records—records that have been traditionally difficult to access such as English wills, unpublished manuscripts, and deeds. In Search of Barnabas Horton pulls together 100 years of isolated research into a cohesive whole. With over 700 primary and secondary source citations plus bibliography, this book will prove an indispensible reference for future researchers of both Barnabas Horton and Southold, New York alike.

Jacqueline Dinan

About The Author

Jacqueline Dinan was born in Westchester County, New York, the middle child of second-generation immigrants. Her professional life always tilted towards the nonprofit sector, where she worked to promote international education (at CIEE) and local communities (at the YMCA). Jackie first heard stories about Barnabas Horton from her husband, a direct descendant. Curious, she tried to substantiate those stories through internet searches, but came up empty. She began seeking out primary documents at libraries and historical societies across New York, New England, and eventually, England. Encouraged by her family’s reaction to shorter historical narratives she’d written, Jackie decided to expand her findings on Barnabas into a book. The result, both biography and micro-history, is the story of an ordinary tradesman in the Atlantic World of the seventeenth century. Jackie lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband, two daughters, a dog, and a cat.

To contact her, send an email to mail@barnabashorton.com.

Reviews


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  • Launie Myers, Grants Pass Oregon says

    So excited to have this book – amazing work. My dear cousin Peggy McConnell researched and completed our grandfather, George Horton Brown’s, genealogy all the way back to 200 AD. It is amazingly complete, especially from before 1000 AD.

    George Horton Brown was born in Logan Iowa in 1883. He is my Mother’s father. I came from the most wonderful family and am so excited to learn more about this branch of family.

    posted on: 1-18-2017
  • Elizabeth H. says

    Jacqueline,

    I am so impressed with In Search of Barnabas Horton. I’m thrilled to learn that I am indeed a descendant of Barnabas Horton through his daughter Hannah Horton Hildreth. I was amazed that I enjoyed learning about the social and economic history of the English Midlands in the 1600s and of Puritan New England. I learned a lot. I was impressed with the amount of research you’ve done and with how well the research is documented. I have read parts of the book so many times that the book is literally falling apart from overuse. Congratulations and thank you!

    posted on: 11-15-2016
  • Susan Elizabeth Boslet Lawruk says

    Thank you for researching and writing this book. Am a direct descendant via Caleb and the Pennsylvania Hortons. I stayed at a B and B on land that was once theirs near Mowsley, England and visited the graveyard in Mowsley. One day hope to go to the Long Island site. Am anxious to read your book!

    posted on: 8-4-2016
  • Theresa Schwab says

    Just ordered your book. Barnabas is a legend in our family! He is six times my 10th great grandfather and 3 times my 9th great grandfather throu his sons Jonathan and Caleb. I’ve visited his grave in Southold and patted his impressive tombstone just to let him know that he isn’t forgotten, but I can’t wait to read the story you’ve put together. I’m letting others in our family know about your book. Best wishes

    posted on: 1-23-2016
  • Carol Hall Murray says

    I am anxious to read your book on Barnabas Horton because all my life I have felt he was a member of our family. My grandmother moved east from Colorado and immediately started researching our lineage deriving from Jonathan. Matter of fact Newsday did a large article on my mother, Esther Greenacres Hall in the ’70s since at that time she was 10th generation American. My father Warren J
    Hall wrote a book PAGANS PURITANS and PATRIOTS which gives a detailed history of Southold and is found in most public and university libraries. Since we have a family of.golfers in the fall we have The Barnabas Horton Tournament so Barnabas lives on!

    posted on: 9-4-2015
  • Gerald Jay Horton says

    Can’t wait to get the book! I have an original edition of the Geo. F. Horton Genealogy that I inherited from my grand parents.
    We are direct descendants from Caleb, and I can track the family tree all the way from Barnabas .

    posted on: 9-1-2015
  • David Minster says

    As a descendant of Barnabas and his son Joseph, I was anxious to read about how my family traced back from Central NY, to Northern PA, and Westchester County NY before that. This incredibly detailed and painstakingly researched history of the Hortons was more than I could have hoped for! The book follows the man, his family, their roles and relationships, and knits them with important historic context to make sense of it all! After reading it, I did the DNA test at Ancestry, so the results that my background is fully 75% British makes perfect sense! Only because I read this in advance of the results. I wish Jacqueline was more closely related to my branch of the Horton line! There are many unanswered questions about later Hortons and their military service and migration. Those will be for another book, another time! THIS book is most HIGHLY recommended.

    posted on: 8-3-2015
  • Catherine Rita McLaren says

    Will drive Friday
    from Fredericksbueg, VA to Matti tuck and stay w/cousin for Booksigning! So excited..Grandma was Isabelle Horton on Mom’s side. Thank you ahead. Found out when testing new phone last week and typed in Barnabas Horton…daughter coming too.

    posted on: 8-2-2015
  • Linda Johnson says

    Also down from Caleb: am only about 60 pages in but was blown away in the first ten pages. For a first book this is unbelievably terrific!!! So much detail, so much history and so much research. I keep one bookmark where I am reading and one where the current sources are listed. This is a marvelous book and exciting to find out so much more about my 8th Great Grandparent. Anxious to keep on reading!
    Fabulous work Jacqueline

    posted on: 7-30-2015
  • Barbara Jo says

    Jackie,
    Thank you so much for writing this book! Would that your husband were a direct descendant of all my ancestors!
    I very much appreciate all the historical research as well as your careful picking through the records to find the real Barnabas Horton (or our direct one, anyway). Didn’t even know about my connection to Wigston Magna. Will now make it a point to drive through on the way to Mowsley.
    Is your book entered in some of the contests for genealogical books? Should be.
    Sincerely: beautiful job!

    Thanks,
    Barbara Jo

    posted on: 7-15-2015
  • Anne Pettavel says

    Jackie, I loved the book! It painted a vivid picture of the world in which Barnabas lived, and brought to life the real person — family man, professional baker, Englishman, and citizen of the New World. Through this story of Barnabas, I saw the story of hundreds of other quiet, tough, and passionate pilgrims who made this perilous journey in those first decades of the “great migration.” Thanks for writing the book I always wanted to read about our immigrant ancestor.

    posted on: 6-30-2015
  • J. Masotti says

    As a descendant of Barnabas (Caleb’s line), I can’t wait to read it!

    posted on: 6-21-2015

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Reader Comments

  • Launie Myers, Grants Pass Oregon says

    So excited to have this book – amazing work. My dear cousin Peggy McConnell researched and completed our grandfather, George Horton Brown’s, genealogy all the way back to 200 AD. It is amazingly complete, especially from before 1000 AD.

    George Horton Brown was born in Logan Iowa in 1883. He is my Mother’s father. I came from the most wonderful family and am so excited to learn more about this branch of family.

    posted on: 1-18-2017
  • Elizabeth H. says

    Jacqueline,

    I am so impressed with In Search of Barnabas Horton. I’m thrilled to learn that I am indeed a descendant of Barnabas Horton through his daughter Hannah Horton Hildreth. I was amazed that I enjoyed learning about the social and economic history of the English Midlands in the 1600s and of Puritan New England. I learned a lot. I was impressed with the amount of research you’ve done and with how well the research is documented. I have read parts of the book so many times that the book is literally falling apart from overuse. Congratulations and thank you!

    posted on: 11-15-2016
  • Susan Elizabeth Boslet Lawruk says

    Thank you for researching and writing this book. Am a direct descendant via Caleb and the Pennsylvania Hortons. I stayed at a B and B on land that was once theirs near Mowsley, England and visited the graveyard in Mowsley. One day hope to go to the Long Island site. Am anxious to read your book!

    posted on: 8-4-2016
  • Theresa Schwab says

    Just ordered your book. Barnabas is a legend in our family! He is six times my 10th great grandfather and 3 times my 9th great grandfather throu his sons Jonathan and Caleb. I’ve visited his grave in Southold and patted his impressive tombstone just to let him know that he isn’t forgotten, but I can’t wait to read the story you’ve put together. I’m letting others in our family know about your book. Best wishes

    posted on: 1-23-2016
  • Carol Hall Murray says

    I am anxious to read your book on Barnabas Horton because all my life I have felt he was a member of our family. My grandmother moved east from Colorado and immediately started researching our lineage deriving from Jonathan. Matter of fact Newsday did a large article on my mother, Esther Greenacres Hall in the ’70s since at that time she was 10th generation American. My father Warren J
    Hall wrote a book PAGANS PURITANS and PATRIOTS which gives a detailed history of Southold and is found in most public and university libraries. Since we have a family of.golfers in the fall we have The Barnabas Horton Tournament so Barnabas lives on!

    posted on: 9-4-2015
  • Gerald Jay Horton says

    Can’t wait to get the book! I have an original edition of the Geo. F. Horton Genealogy that I inherited from my grand parents.
    We are direct descendants from Caleb, and I can track the family tree all the way from Barnabas .

    posted on: 9-1-2015
  • David Minster says

    As a descendant of Barnabas and his son Joseph, I was anxious to read about how my family traced back from Central NY, to Northern PA, and Westchester County NY before that. This incredibly detailed and painstakingly researched history of the Hortons was more than I could have hoped for! The book follows the man, his family, their roles and relationships, and knits them with important historic context to make sense of it all! After reading it, I did the DNA test at Ancestry, so the results that my background is fully 75% British makes perfect sense! Only because I read this in advance of the results. I wish Jacqueline was more closely related to my branch of the Horton line! There are many unanswered questions about later Hortons and their military service and migration. Those will be for another book, another time! THIS book is most HIGHLY recommended.

    posted on: 8-3-2015
  • Catherine Rita McLaren says

    Will drive Friday
    from Fredericksbueg, VA to Matti tuck and stay w/cousin for Booksigning! So excited..Grandma was Isabelle Horton on Mom’s side. Thank you ahead. Found out when testing new phone last week and typed in Barnabas Horton…daughter coming too.

    posted on: 8-2-2015
  • Linda Johnson says

    Also down from Caleb: am only about 60 pages in but was blown away in the first ten pages. For a first book this is unbelievably terrific!!! So much detail, so much history and so much research. I keep one bookmark where I am reading and one where the current sources are listed. This is a marvelous book and exciting to find out so much more about my 8th Great Grandparent. Anxious to keep on reading!
    Fabulous work Jacqueline

    posted on: 7-30-2015
  • Barbara Jo says

    Jackie,
    Thank you so much for writing this book! Would that your husband were a direct descendant of all my ancestors!
    I very much appreciate all the historical research as well as your careful picking through the records to find the real Barnabas Horton (or our direct one, anyway). Didn’t even know about my connection to Wigston Magna. Will now make it a point to drive through on the way to Mowsley.
    Is your book entered in some of the contests for genealogical books? Should be.
    Sincerely: beautiful job!

    Thanks,
    Barbara Jo

    posted on: 7-15-2015
  • Anne Pettavel says

    Jackie, I loved the book! It painted a vivid picture of the world in which Barnabas lived, and brought to life the real person — family man, professional baker, Englishman, and citizen of the New World. Through this story of Barnabas, I saw the story of hundreds of other quiet, tough, and passionate pilgrims who made this perilous journey in those first decades of the “great migration.” Thanks for writing the book I always wanted to read about our immigrant ancestor.

    posted on: 6-30-2015
  • J. Masotti says

    As a descendant of Barnabas (Caleb’s line), I can’t wait to read it!

    posted on: 6-21-2015

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